Archive for February, 2019

Back to sea; NECP Transect Survey 25/02/19

by on Feb.27, 2019, under Bottlenose Dolphin

As many of our regular readers may already know, I was diagnosed with a rare and progressive illness last year and had surgery at the start of January to alleviate the worst of the symptoms. One of the most frustrating things, as well as having to have a couple of months break from NEWT safaris, has been having to stay onshore and not do any survey work for the North East Cetacean Project. Monday was the first time in months that I’ve felt well enough to consider spending a day at sea so I left the house as a beautiful sunrise was developing and drove to Whitley Bay to collect Andy. We met up with Caroline at Royal Quays and then on to the St Aidan.

Once we were out of the Tyne it was obvious that conditions were as good as we’d thought they’d be. Heading north we had four sightings of Harbour Porpoise, although they were all typically shy, and as were about to have lunch a loud shout of “dolphins” from Andy heralded the arrival of 40-50 Bottlenose Dolphins that stayed around the boat for 45mins 🙂

It’s good to be back 😉

Bottlenose Dolphins [Tursiops truncatus] off Dunstanburgh, Northumberland 25/02/19
Bottlenose Dolphins [Tursiops truncatus] off Dunstanburgh, Northumberland 25/02/19
Bottlenose Dolphins [Tursiops truncatus] off Dunstanburgh, Northumberland 25/02/19
Bottlenose Dolphins [Tursiops truncatus] off Dunstanburgh, Northumberland 25/02/19
Bottlenose Dolphins [Tursiops truncatus] off Dunstanburgh, Northumberland 25/02/19
Bottlenose Dolphins [Tursiops truncatus] off Dunstanburgh, Northumberland 25/02/19
Bottlenose Dolphins [Tursiops truncatus] off Dunstanburgh, Northumberland 25/02/19
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Fretting; Otter mini-Safari 24/02/19

by on Feb.27, 2019, under Druridge Bay

I usually say that the only weather condition that isn’t good for wildlife-watching is really strong wind. There is another one though, but it’s pretty infrequent…

I collected Barry and Bridie from Warkworth under blue sky and beautiful late winter sunshine and we headed towards Druridge Bay for a few hours. I knew what we were heading towards though as I’d driven through fog on the way north. We started with an hour or so of rolling sea fret that brought visibility down to tens of metres, as Cormorants did their very best Otter impersonations and the loud calls of Oystercatchers carried through the mist as they flew overhead. Mallard, Teal, Wigeon, Gadwall, Tufted Duck, Red-breasted Merganser, Shelduck, Whooper Swan, Canada Goose, Greylag Goose and Pink-footed Goose were all feeding, resting or diving, two drake Pintail were stunning in the low-angled sunlight, the squeals of Water Rail emanated from the reeds as the chill of late afternoon began to probe and nip at our exposed faces and the evocative calls of Curlew cut through the hazy mist of dusk.

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Spring has sprung? Otter mini-Safari 23/02/19

by on Feb.24, 2019, under Druridge Bay, Southeast Northumberland

After a break from Safaris and blogging, after I was diagnosed with a rare illness last year and had surgery in early January, it was great to be back out in the field with clients yesterday.

I collected Paul and Jennifer, Paul and Kirsty and Alastair and Jess from Newbiggin and we set off for a few hours around Druridge Bay and southeast Northumberland. With temperatures in double figures, Robins, Chaffinches and Dunnocks were singing and a noisy flock of Long-tailed Tits moved through the riverside vegetation. Goldeneye, Gadwall, Mallard, Little Grebe and Cormorant were on the water and a Little Egret was stalking along the edge of a rapidly filling tidal channel. Grey Herons were nest-building and you could be forgiven for forgetting that it’s still winter here…

As daylight faded small flocks of Starling were heading to roost, a Roe Deer was close to the water’s edge and Whooper Swans noisily heralded their arrival. A pair of Canada Geese were looking alert and agitated then Mallard, Teal, Wigeon, Goldeneye, Tufted Duck and the geese took off in a panic. From the direction they scattered we could tell where the source of their consternation was…hidden from view by a reedbed in front of us.

As darkness began to exert it’s grip on the eastern sky hundreds of Pink-footed Geese arrived at their nighttime roost, still coming in from all directions when they were only visible as a dark speckling against a leaden grey sky and we headed back to Newbiggin.

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